Command line fundamentals - redirect a command’s output to a file

This is a pretty basic command line tip, but if you're new to all this CLI goodness, you might not be aware of it.

When you run a command normally, the output from that command gets sent to the terminal you're working on, so you can see what happened. Sometimes, though, this isn't what you want to do.

All modern command line shells support something called redirecting ...

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Using netcat

Once again, it's time to take a look at a really neat command line tool that comes with almost all Unix-like operating systems. This tool is called netcat. What it does sounds quite geeky and advanced:

use network sockets from the command line

What that means in more simple terms is that you can create a server which listens on a port, and interact with a server listening on ...

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Command line tip - banish ‘command not found’ when using su

Sometimes, if you're following a tutorial on doing something on your Linux box and you're trying to fix something, you'll be asked to go to a terminal and type in some commands. Often, these commands need to be run as root, the administrator.

In almost all distributions except Ubuntu, you gain root access at the terminal with the command:

$ su

You might also be asked to use ...

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