Video: Enable Desktop Search on Ubuntu 8.10

Being able to search your desktop is important. I frequently need to find that file that I know I have somewhere, but have no idea where I put it. Desktop search is a really neat solution, because it means you just start typing and it does the hard work of searching for you.

Ubuntu’s latest release at the time of writing, 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex), does have an excellent desktop search tool built in, but it’s not actually switched on by default.

In this quick video demo, I show you how to switch on the desktop search tool and how to get it indexing your system for the first time speedily, before setting it back to a background level of activity again.

If you just want a quick fix and don’t want to watch the whole video (it’s only short!), you can enable desktop search by going to System > Preferences > Search and Indexing.


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Avatar for peter Peter Upfold - http://peter.upfold.org.uk/

Peter Upfold is a technology enthusiast from the UK. Peter’s interest in Linux stems back to 2003, when curiosity got the better of him and he began using SUSE 9.0. Now he runs Linux Mint 9 on the desktop, runs a CentOS-based web server from home for his personal website and dabbles in all sorts of technology things across the Windows, Mac and open source worlds.

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Discussion: Video: Enable Desktop Search on Ubuntu 8.10

  1. # Posted on 01 April 2009 at 01:05 PM

    There are two sides of the fence on the Tracker (desktop search) war: you love it or you hate it. I'm with the latter.

    Sure, desktop indexing is cool, but I would prefer to not have my desktop grind to a halt when I extract a Django tarball in my home folder just so Tracker can poke through it all.

    It's at least gotten past some of the worse problems (like trying to do a full index while on battery), but it's left a distinct mark that makes me not want to use it.

    However, if you do find yourself searching for files a lot, it may be of use, though I still recommend setting the search priority to the lowest it can go. Indexes will take longer to update, but you'll enjoy a much more responsive machine.

    I do agree that it has its uses.



  2. # Posted on 01 April 2009 at 09:09 PM

    Jacob Peddicord said:

    There are two sides of the fence on the Tracker (desktop search) war: you love it or you hate it. I'm with the latter.

    Sure, desktop indexing is cool, but I would prefer to not have my desktop grind to a halt when I extract a Django tarball in my home folder just so Tracker can poke through it all.

    It's at least gotten past some of the worse problems (like trying to do a full index while on battery), but it's left a distinct mark that makes me not want to use it.

    However, if you do find yourself searching for files a lot, it may be of use, though I still recommend setting the search priority to the lowest it can go. Indexes will take longer to update, but you'll enjoy a much more responsive machine.

    I do agree that it has its uses.

    I found the initial index to be pretty quick, although I did leave the machine idle and let it do the index without contest from other processes.

    I will give it a while and play around with it running in the background. Frankly, though, I'm so used to desktop search just working in... other not-so-free Unix-like operating systems... that I might be willing to take some performance hit for the convenience. We'll see.



  3. theresa (guest)

    # Posted on 06 October 2009 at 01:47 AM

    Can I enter



  4. Polprav (guest)

    # Posted on 17 October 2009 at 03:44 PM

    Hello from Russia! Can I quote a post in your blog with the link to you?



  5. # Posted on 17 October 2009 at 03:55 PM

    Polprav,

    Feel free to quote this post on your blog in accordance with our Creative Commons licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/



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