Command line tip - display who is logged in to your system

A really quick command line tip for you today, and that is how to find out who is logged on to your Linux system. The command I'm going to show you also lets you know where they are logged in from, if they are a remote user, and shows you uptime statistics and other information.

The command itself is actually one of the shortest commands there is - w. Simply ...

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Customize your Titlebar

Getting a little bored with your titlebar? We all are at some point. While many know that you can change the look of the titlebar with a few clicks, few know that the individual buttons can be rearranged.

Woah now, you can change the order of the buttons? Yes, with a little help from GConf.

To start, open up GConf Editor (follow the link above to see how) and navigate ...

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Sudo and Su

You've probably seen one of these commands. Ubuntu users have seen more of sudo, while SUSE, Fedora, and Debian have used su more often. What exactly is the difference?

Both of the commands enable you to gain root access. The major difference is in how privileges are obtained.

Su


Su is a command that enables you to open a shell or login as another user. Run without any parameters ...

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